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USDA Issues Dry Bean Solicitation

 
USDA has issued a soliciation for canned vegetables and dry bean pursuant to the AMS Master Solicitation for use in the Federal Food and Nutrition Assistance Programs. Offers are due April 6, 2020. The full details are available here.

Dry Bean Scene

The U.S. Department of State is temporarily waiving interviews for first-time and returning H-2 visa applications. This flexibility will allow farmers to use past workers or those already in the U.S. Learn more in the latest Dry Bean Scene from the Northarvest Bean Growers Association on the Red River Farm Network.

Beans with Spring Greens

Greens like arugula, spinach and watercress are at their freshest in early spring, even when there is still frost in the air. Enjoy them with pink or pinto beans in this fast recipe that is packed with the flavors of spring. Discover the recipe here.

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

Dry bean trading activity is slow to steady with very good demand, according to USDA’s Weekly Market News. Contract product is moving steady. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are at $32 to $38 per cwt. Black beans remain steady at $25 to $28 per cwt and navy beans are at $28 to $30 per cwt. Kidney bean prices for Minnesota remain steady at $39 to $46 per cwt.

Northarvest Seeks an Executive Director

The Northarvest Bean Growers Association, located in Fargo, North Dakota, seeks to hire a proven leader as its Executive Director. This position is responsible for administering and overseeing all programs, projects and contracts; working with the board members; managing office staff; and assisting with the development and management of the budget, along with other duties as assigned. Northarvest represents dry bean growers (pinto, navy, black, dark red kidney, light red kidney, pink, cranberry, small red, white kidney and Great Northern) in North Dakota and Minnesota.
 
Candidates will possess a bachelor’s degree with previous leadership experience. Excellent human relation skills with knowledge of the agriculture industry are essential to this position. Experience in market development and research is preferred. Travel required both in and out of state and international. Northarvest offers a competitive compensation and benefits package and a stable work environment.
 

Build a Bean Burger, Your Way

Create your own delicious, homemade bean burger with whatever ingredients you have on hand. Switching out spices and other ingredients presents endless options for your creations. Discover the recipe here

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

Dry bean trading activity is slow to steady with very good demand, according to USDA’s Weekly Market News. Contract product is moving steady. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are at $32 to $38 per cwt. Black beans remain steady at $25 to $28 per cwt and navy beans are at $28 to $30 per cwt. Kidney bean prices for Minnesota remain steady at $39 to $46 per cwt.

Dried vs. Canned Beans

When faced with the choice of cooking with dry beans or canned beans, what’s the best option for home cooks? The answer depends on many factors, including cost, convenience, and control.

Cost: If you want to save money, cook with dry beans.

Dry beans cost less per serving than canned beans. For example, a one pound bag of dry pinto beans costs, on average, $1.79 and will make 12-½ cup servings of cooked beans whereas a 15 oz. can of national brand pinto beans costs $1.69, a store brand can costs $1.19, and each provides 3.5-½ cup servings. This means that a serving of pinto beans made from dry beans costs just $0.15 while a serving of store brand canned pinto beans costs $0.34 and the national brand costs $0.48. A family of four that eats beans once a week could save nearly $80 per year by choosing dry beans versus a national brand of canned beans.

Type of Bean Cost Per Serving*
Dry Pinto Beans $0.15
Canned Pinto Beans (store brand) $0.34
Canned Pinto Beans (national brand) $0.48

*Prices based on a supermarket price review conducted in November 2015.

Convenience: If you want to save time, cook with canned beans.

While many people will find the cost savings of dry beans very appealing, they won’t necessarily like the time and effort it takes to cook with dry beans. It can take 3 to 24 hours—depending on soaking and cooking method—to sort, rinse, soak, and cook dry beans before you are ready to add them to a recipe whereas cooking with canned beans is as easy as opening the can. If you value your time more than your money, using canned beans is the better option. With that said, you can also cook larger batches of dry beans, and then freeze for use in dishes like soups, stews, and chili thereby providing both the cost savings of dry beans and the convenience of a ready-to-use canned ingredient.

Control: If you want less sodium, cook with dry beans.

A third issue to consider is the control you have when you start with dry beans, specifically over the amount of sodium in the final dish. A ½ cup serving of pinto beans cooked from dry beans with no added salt is virtually sodium free while a ½ cup serving of canned pinto beans contains approximately 200 milligrams of sodium. You can drain and rinse canned beans to remove about 40 percent of the sodium. You can also buy lower sodium versions of many canned bean products. But if you want to more carefully control the sodium in the final dish, you’re better off starting with dry beans. Finally, keep in mind that when cooking dry beans it’s best to not add salt or other ingredients that contain sodium until the beans are soft and fully cooked. The sodium can affect the beans’ ability to fully cook and soften.

(Source: The Bean Institute)

Dry Bean Scene

Farmers are planning for the 2020 crop. Leeds, North Dakota farmer Eric Jorgenson says despite some challenges, the outlook for dry beans remains positive. Get the details in the latest Dry Bean Scene from the Northarvest Bean Growers Association on the Red River Farm Network.

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

Dry bean trading activity is slow to steady with very good demand, according to USDA’s Weekly Market News. Contract product is moving steady. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are at $32 to $38 per cwt. Black beans remain steady at $25 to $27 per cwt and navy beans are at $30 per cwt. Kidney bean prices for Minnesota remain steady at $38 to $46 per cwt.