Posts

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

 
SPECIAL NOTE: The next report will be released after the Thanksgiving holiday on December 1. View the USDA Weekly Market Review from November 17.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Dry bean trading activity is steady according to USDA’s Weekly Market Review. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are $22 to $25 per cwt. Black bean prices range from $23 to $25 per cwt, and navy beans at $26-$27 per cwt. Light red kidney bean bids come in at $40 to $43 cwt and dark reds remain at $34 to $39 cwt.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Dry bean trading activity is steady according to USDA’s Weekly Market Review. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are $22 to $24 per cwt. Black bean prices range from $23 to $25 per cwt and navy beans at $26 to $27 per cwt. Light red kidney bean bids come in at $40 to $43 cwt and dark reds at $34 to $39 cwt.

Dry Bean Value Proposition Study Results

In March, the U.S. Dry Bean Council commissioned a research project designed to identify the value proposition of U.S. dry beans. This is a critical part of the global marketing strategy to help define and tell the story of what makes U.S. dry beans stand out. This information will be incorporated into future marketing plans. 
 
Consumers in Spain tend to display the strongest recognition scores of the various types of beans. Overall, beans are perceived to be versatile, as they are used for many different occasions in each of the EU countries. In Spain and France, they are used as an entrée/in the center of the plate. The UK scores highest “as an ingredient to use in everyday home-cooked meals”, as well as “a healthy addition to their diet/meals”.
 
Get the full details here.
Grady Thorsgard - Harvest (black and pinto)

Mexico Harvest Update

The last update from the U.S. Dry Bean Council on the Mexican dry bean harvest indicated that lack of rain in August had an impact on yield. Total precipitation in August was 34% lower than anticipated causing extreme drought in some states such as Chihuahua and Durango. As a result, the latest assessment projects that total hectares planted were around 1.17 million and not the 1.39 million reported by the Mexican Agricultural Information Service (SIAP). Throughout September, the precipitation did not pick up at the required pace and will likely continue to impact yield.
 
As of the last assessment, USDBC is projecting Mexico’s total bean production for the 2020 Spring/Summer Cycle to top out at around 749,404 MT, 21.5% less than SIAP’s estimate of 954,000 MT but still 36.3% higher than the 592,670 MT short harvest of 2019 and 12.1% shorter than the historic average of 852,102 MT (SIAP). Harvest has been delayed by the lack of rain but will continue through October.
 
For more specifics on bean production in the 2020 Spring/Summer harvest see the full report on the USDBC members only page.

Dry Beans Sought

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has issued a solicitation for dry edible beans for use in the National School Lunch Program and other Federal Food and Nutrition Assistance Programs. Packaged Great Northern, light red kidney and pinto beans are being sought. Bids are due November 16 and acceptances will be announced by November 30. View the offer here.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Dry bean trading activity is steady according to USDA’s Weekly Market Review. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are $22 to $24 per cwt. Black bean prices range from $24 to $25 per cwt and navy beans at $26 per cwt. Light red kidney bean bids come in at $40 to $43 cwt and dark reds dropped to $34 to $39 cwt.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Dry bean trading activity is steady according to USDA’s Weekly Market Review. North Dakota and Minnesota grower prices for pinto beans are $22 to $23 per cwt. Black bean prices range from $24 to $25 per cwt and navy beans at $26 per cwt. Light red kidney bean bids come in at $40 to $43 cwt and dark reds dropped to $34 to $39 cwt.
Grady Thorsgard - Harvest (black and pinto)

Dry Bean Harvest Progress – October 26

Colorado – Harvest was 92% complete, ahead of 85% last year.
 
Michigan – Harvest was 93% complete, ahead of 76% last year and 87% average.
 
View the latest USDA Weekly Crop Progress Report here.

Recipe: Baja Quesadillas

Add some protein and nutrition to the traditional Mexican-food favorite with a tasty quesadilla recipe with beans! Using both black and pinto beans, and even zucchini, this quesadilla recipe is chock-full of healthy foods and bold flavors.
 
Ingredients
  • Vegetable cooking spray
  • 1 medium zucchini, cut lengthwise in half, sliced
  • 1 cup sliced onion
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 small jalapeqo chili, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 15-ounce can, rinsed and drained, or 1 3/4 cups cooked dry-packaged black beans
  • 1 15-ounce can, rinsed and drained, or 1 3/4 cups cooked dry-packaged pinto beans
  • 1 cup chopped tomato
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 12 tortillas (6-inch)
  • 3/4 to 1 cup (3 to 4 ounces) shredded four-cheese Mexican blend or reduced-fat four-cheese Mexican blend
  • Salsa, as garnish
  • Sour cream, as garnish
Directions
  1. Preheat oven at 450 degrees.
  2. Spray large skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium heat until hot. Sauté zucchini, onion, garlic, jalapeno chili and cumin until crisp & tender, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add beans to side of skillet; coarsely mash about half the beans. Mix beans, tomato and cilantro into onion mixture and cook 1 to 2 minutes.
  4. Spoon 1/3 cup mixture on one side of each tortilla and sprinkle with 1 1/2 tablespoons cheese. Fold tortillas in half and spray both sides with cooking spray.
  5. Bake on cookie sheet until browned and crisp, 5 to 7 minutes, or cook in large skillet over medium heat until browned, 2 to 3 minutes on each side.
  6. Garnish quesadillas with salsa and sour cream.
 
Hungry for more? View all recipes from the U.S. Dry Bean Council here.