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Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Dry beans under contract are moving at a steady pace with current crop prices steady with moderate demand. USDA Market News puts the grower price for black beans in North Dakota and Minnesota at $35-to-$36 per hundredweight. Pinto bean prices are holding steady at $34-$35 per hundredweight, and navies are at $32-33. Kidney bean prices remain at $41 to $46 per hundredweight for lights and darks.
 
View the May 4 report.

Crop Progress Report – May 3, 2021

There were 6 days suitable for field work in North Dakota last week, according to USDA. Topsoil moisture supplies declined three percent to 83% very short-to-short, and subsoil moisture is pinned at 81% very short-to-short. 42% of spring wheat is seeded, an increase of 20% from the previous week, with 6% emerged. Corn plantings jumped 11% to 14%. That is well ahead of 3% last year. 8% of canola is in the ground, along with 66% of sugarbeets. 23% of potatoes are planted. Both soybean and dry bean planting are beginning in North Dakota at 2% complete.
 
Below normal temps persisted in Minnesota last week, farmers still found 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork. Spring wheat seeding is over two weeks ahead of last year’s pace at 72% complete. That’s an increase of 53% from last week. Corn planting is 60% complete, behind 71%t last year but ahead of 32% average. Soybean planting is at 23%, behind 31% last year. 79% of sugarbeets are planted, along with 5% of dry beans. Both topsoil and subsoil moisture supplies are rated 65% adequate-to-surplus in Minnesota.
 
Dry edible bean planting has also begun in western growing regions. Idaho is 28% planted, Washington is at 74% and Montana is at 15%. More than half of the topsoil short or very short of moisture in Colorado (57%), Montana (57%) and Wyoming (55%).
 
Get the latest Crop Progress Report.

Pulse Crop Research Proposals Being Sought

The Pulse Crop Health Initiative has announced the opening of its current funding cycle, seeking submissions for research proposals for fiscal year 2021 funding. PCHI is a special project, funded through the Farm Bill, with approximately $4.3 million available in grants for FY 21. Most projects funded are at the level of $60,000 to $100,000 (per institution on a project). 

The goal of PCHI is to rely on research conducted through the various funded projects on pulse crops (dry peas, lentils, chickpeas, and dry beans) to “provide solutions to the critical health and sustainability challenges facing the citizens of the United States and the global community. “

Research should be focused on any/all of the following research areas:

  1. Human Health Improvement & Chronic Disease Prevention
  2. Functionality Traits & Food Security
  3. Sustainability of Pulse Production Systems

The deadline for submitting the application packet is May 14. Plans of work will be reviewed by an independent scientific panel and rankings will be discussed with the Steering Committee before final decisions are made.

For additional contact Michael A. Grusak, Center Director, USDA-ARS Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center at 701-239-1371 or mike.grusak@usda.gov. 

Research Project Seeks Input on Pulse Flours

A new research project out of Michigan State University’s Food Legume Quality Genetics Research Lab is studying the quality of beans and pulses for use as a flour ingredient. 

The survey is directed to food industry professionals who use any type of pulse flour in their products. According to researchers, the objectives are to:

  1. Identify the food industry’s interest and experience with pulse flours.
  2. Improve characteristics of alternative flours made from beans, peas, chickpeas, and others through crop breeding.

Responses are confidential and will not be linked to your name or company in reports. Follow this link to take the survey.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Dry beans under contract are moving at a steady pace with current crop prices steady with moderate demand. USDA Market News puts the grower price for black beans unchanged in North Dakota and Minnesota at $27-to-$32 per hundredweight. Pinto bean prices are holding steady at $30-$33 per hundredweight, and navies are at $32. Kidney bean prices remain at $40 to $46 per hundredweight for lights and darks.

View the April 27 report.

Living Ag in the Classroom Goes Virtual

North Dakota’s Living Ag in the Classroom event didn’t go as planned due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, with the quick thinking of the committee, commodity groups created videos to share with elementary school-aged students throughout the state. Watch the Northarvest Bean Growers Association video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7p-deaAVH-4.

Annual Dry Bean Market News Summary Available

USDA has released the 2021 Dry Bean Market News summary. This report contains monthly average prices, production by commercial class and/or state, exports by country of destination, purchases for domestic feeding programs and supply and distribution of dry beans in the U.S.

That document can be found here.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

USDA Market News puts the grower price for black beans unchanged in North Dakota and Minnesota at $27-to-$32 per hundredweight. Pinto bean prices are holding steady at $30 per hundredweight, and navies are at $32. Kidney bean prices remain at $40 to $46 per hundredweight for lights and darks. Dry beans under contract are moving at a steady pace with current crop prices steady with moderate demand. According to report contacts, rail cars, trucks and containers are still difficult to source.
 

Crop Progress Report – April 19, 2021

In North Dakota, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service says there were just over 2.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 19. Topsoil moisture is rated 78% short to very short, and subsoil moisture is rated 77% short to very short. 13% of spring wheat is seeded, and corn planting is underway at 3% complete. Sugarbeets, oats, barley, dry edible peas and potatoes are also in the ground.
 
Snow and rain also limited Minnesota farmers to 2.5 days of fieldwork last week. However, spring wheat seeding is 10 days ahead of last year’s pace. 29% of oats are planted, along with 6%of barley and 5% of potatoes. Topsoil moisture is 78% adequate-to-surplus, and subsoil moisture is rated at 70% adequate-to-surplus.
 

Dry Bean Growers Do Qualify for Government Assistance

Questions have been circulating on whether or not dry bean producers are eligible for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program payments. According to Tom Hance with Gordly Associates, the answer is yes. Dry edible beans are fall under the Sales Commodities category of CFAP 2.
 
“Dry beans are included in CFAP 2,” said Hance. “Growers are able to amend and increase this payment if they received a crop insurance indemnity or WHIP+ payment for 2019 production. Those producers can also have their CFAP 2 payment calculated using their 2018 sales.”
 
Famers who have not already applied for CFAP 2 can do so through their county Farm Service Agency office.
 
In addition, USDA has set aside $6 billion for the Pandemic Assistance for Producers program. This is another opportunity for compensation to dry bean producers, said Hance in a Red River Farm Network interview.
 
“There are a list of entities that will possibly be included in this $6 billion. The specialty crops in the sales commodity category, including dry beans, are among those that could potentially be included.”
 
Hance stresses that this decision is subject to rulemaking, so it will be several months before it will be known how the funds are distributed.