Posts

Emergency Procedures Announced to Streamline Crop Insurance Claims

USDA’s Risk Management Agency is authorizing emergency procedures as extreme drought conditions persist across the country. The agency is working with crop insurance companies to simplify the adjustment of losses and issue indemnity payments.
 
“We recognize the distress experienced by farmers and ranchers because of drought,” said Richard Flournoy, acting administrator, RMA. “These emergency procedures will authorize insurance companies to expedite the claims process, enabling them to plant a new crop or a cover crop.”
 
Companies can now accept delayed notices of loss in certain situations, streamline paperwork and reduce the number of required samples when crop damage is consistent. Farmers should contact their crop insurance agent as soon as any damage is spotted. Insurance companies must look at the damage before the crop acres are put to another use. Once it has been appraised and released, farmers can then cut the crop for silage, destroy it or plant a cover crop on that field.
 
More information on these emergency procedures is available on the RMA website. Get the full details from Flournoy in this Red River Farm Network story.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

USDA Market News reports most dry bean prices the Minn-Dak region are unchanged from the previous week. Grower prices for black beans in North Dakota and Minnesota at $36-to-$40 per hundredweight (cwt). Pinto bean prices are at $35-to-$38 per cwt. Navy beans are at $33-to-$36 per cwt. Dark red and light red kidney bean prices are at $44-to-$48 per cwt. Product movement remains mostly slow on light to moderate demand and prices were steady to firm. View the July 13 report.

RMA Strengthens Dry Bean Insurance Policy

USDA is making improvements to crop insurance to better enable agricultural producers to manage risk on their operations. Specifically, USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) is adding new options for producers of dry beans.
 
Beginning in 2022, the Dry Beans and Dry Peas regulation will:
  • Allow enterprise and optional units by type for dry beans and dry peas, preventing a gain on one type of crop from impacting an indemnity for a loss on another type. Enterprise units by type allow a producer to insure all acres of a type in a county as one unit, as opposed to basic and optional units which may base insurance on a portion of the acreage. Enterprise units are attractive to producers due to additional premium discounts provided given risk is diversified across the county.
  • Also, allow enterprise and optional units for dry beans to be insured by written agreement, which is consistent with current provisions for dry peas.
  • Clarify that if no insurable fall planted acreage exists, the later spring sales closing date would apply in counties that have offers for both the fall and spring-planted types.
Crop insurance is sold and delivered solely through private crop insurance agents. A list of crop insurance agents is available at all USDA Service Centers and online at the RMA Agent Locator. Learn more about crop insurance and the modern farm safety net at rma.usda.gov.

Crop Progress Report – July 12, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated 13% very poor, 30% poor, 41% fair, 14% good, and 2% excellent. Dry edible beans blooming was 18%, near 21% last year, and behind 28% average. Setting pods was 1%.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were rated 32% very short, 43% short, 24% adequate, and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 42% very short, 38% short, 20% adequate, and 0% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans were were 50% blooming and 9% setting pods. Dry bean condition declined to 40% good to excellent, compared to the previous week’s 47%.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota 27% very short, 49% short, 24% adequate and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 26% very short, 50% short,
24% adequate and 0% surplus.
 
Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

USDA Seeks Dry Beans

USDA is seeking dry beans for using in the National School Lunch Program and other Federal Food and Nutrition Assistance Programs. Including in the offer are packaged Great Northern and pinto beans, along with 2,000-pound totes of pinto beans. The specialist for this solicitation is Christopher Edwards. The contracting officer for this solicitation is Kelli Dawkins. Please contact the specialist first with questions regarding the requirements of this solicitation.
 

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

USDA Market News reports most dry bean prices the Min-Dak region unchanged from the previous week. Grower prices for black beans in North Dakota and Minnesota at $36-to-$40 per hundredweight (cwt). Pinto bean prices are at $36-to-$38 per cwt. Navy beans are at $33 per cwt. Dark red and light red kidney bean prices are at $44-to-$47 per cwt. Dry bean contracted product continues to move steadily. New trade remains light as many wait to estimate new crop yield, according to numerous industry contacts. Demand continues to vary as abnormally high temperatures and drought persist in many growing regions.
 

Crop Progress Report – July 6, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated 12% very poor, 31% poor, 40% fair, 15% good, and 2% excellent. Blooming was 9%, equal to last year, and near 11% average. Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota rated 35% very short, 41% short, 23% adequate, and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 46% very short, 35% short, 19% adequate, and 0% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans were 25% blooming, in line with 24% last year and ahead of 11% average. Condition declined to 47% good-to-excellent, compared to the previous week’s 48%, with the remainder of the crop 1% very poor, 8% poor and 44% fair. Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were rated 28% very short, 50% short, 21% adequate and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 24% very short, 49% short, 26% adequate and 1% surplus.
 
Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.
Grady Thorsgard - Harvest (black and pinto)

Pinto Beans Purchased

USDA has purchased dry beans under Section 32 for distribution to child nutrition and other domestic food assistance programs for Fiscal Year 2021. The purchase includes 2321,360 CS of pinto beans totaling more than $3.4 million.
 

USDBC Submits Unified Export Strategy

The U.S. Dry Bean Council (USDBC) submitted the annual Unified Export Strategy (UES) for the 2022 program year to USDA/FAS. The UES is the comprehensive annual global strategy for the U.S. dry bean industry that details the market conditions, constraints, opportunities, activities, and benchmarks in current and emerging export markets.
 
While strategies change from year to year to reflect the current global and market specific realities, the 2022 application underwent a particularly significant rewrite. This is due to a number of global trends, including:
 
  • The lingering impact of COVID and the desire for shelf stable healthy food.
  • Increasing popularity of plant slant and plant based diets.
  • A desire to eat foods that are sustainably produced.
  • A growing interest in bean ingredients such as flours.
  • An optimistic outlook regarding the resolution of long standing tariff disputes that have limited U.S. dry bean exports to certain markets. 
The application also addresses long standing trade policy constraints, such as:
  • The lack of harmonization and missing global tolerances for pesticides (MRLs), ongoing retaliatory tariffs in critical markets.
  • Lack of compliance with existing trade agreements that allow zero duty.
  • Zero quota imports of U.S. dry beans.
  • The need to produce evidence of the U.S. dry bean industry’s sustainable farming practices. 
Funding decisions and allocations will be announced in fall 2021.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

Compared to last week, dry bean product movement is slow to inactive. Prices are mostly steady to firm on moderate demand. Drought and higher than normal temperatures persist throughout many of the growing regions. USDA Market News puts the grower price for black beans in North Dakota and Minnesota at $38-to-$40 per hundredweight (cwt). Pinto bean prices are at $38-to-$40 per cwt. Navy beans are at $33-to-$38 per cwt. Dark red and light red kidney bean prices are at $44-to-$47 per cwt.
 
View the June 15 report.