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ERS and NIFA to Relocate to Kansas City Area

USDA has selected the Kansas City Region to relocate the Economic Research Service and National Institute of Food and Agriculture. A Cost Benefit Analysis was conducted and conservative estimates show a savings of nearly $300 million nominally over a 15-year lease term on employment costs and rent, or about $20 million per year. The region is close to multiple land grant universities, providing access to a stable labor force. Out of NIFA’s 315 positions, 294 will relocate while 21 will stay in the NCR. Of the 329 ERS positions, 253 will relocate while 76 will stay in the Washington, D.C. area.
 

Perdue Promises Trade Assistance as “Quickly as Possible”

While few details are still available, the proposal for USDA’s latest round of Market Facilitation Program payments is currently under review by the Office of Management and Budget. Speaking to reporters in Washington D.C. on Wednesday, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said the trade assistance will go out to farmers as quickly as possible.

“It more than likely won’t be completed in the next two months, but we’re going to move as quickly as we can. We are not revealing details at this point in time.” One reporter asked if the $16 billion would make farmers whole. Perdue said “the purpose is to make them where they’re able to pay their obligations and be able to produce again the following year.”

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

According to USDA’s Weekly Market News, trading activity remains slow for dry edible beans with very light demand. Contract product is moving steady. Grower prices for all classes of dry beans remain unchanged from one week ago. View the report here.

USDA Crop Progress – June 10

Dry bean planting in North Dakota is at 89 percent, compared to 72 percent last week. That is near 94 percent last year and 90 percent average. Emergence is at 38 percent, well behind 61 percent last year and 58 percent average.
 
In Minnesota, dry bean planting is at 87 percent, compared to 64 percent last week. That pace is behind last year and the average of 90 percent. Emergence is at 45 percent, well behind 75 percent last year and 65 percent average.
 
USDA is reporting 94 percent of Montana dry beans are planted and 48 percent emerged. Seventy-two percent of the crop is planted in Idaho and 53 percent emerged. In Oregon, planting is at 83 percent with 50 percent emergence, and 94 percent of dry beans are planted with 80 percent emergence in Washington. Wyoming dry bean farmers have 50 percent of the crop planted and 22 percent is emerged. Planting is at 14 percent in Colorado and just three percent emergence.
 
Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.

MFP Details Coming Soon

The details of the new Market Facilitation Program will be released within a matter of days. “I believe people deserve an answer sooner rather than later,” said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Perdue emphasized the goals of the MFP payments differ from prevented plant coverage. “The Market Facilitation Program is designed for tariff disruptions and we have a safety net in insurance over prevented plant.”

The USDA legal team has determined crops must be planted to be eligible for MFP payments. With the new trade assistance plan, farmers will receive payments based on a county rate and their eligible planted acres in 2019. The formula for the county rates has not been announced, but will be based on the trade impact for the crops grown in the county.

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

According to USDA’s Weekly Market News, trading activity remains slow for dry edible beans with very light demand. Contract product is moving steady. Grower prices for pintos, blacks and navies are unchanged from one week ago. View the report here.

USDA Crop Progress – June 3

Dry bean planting in North Dakota is at 72 percent, compared to 49 percent last week. That is behind 80 percent last year and near 76 percent average. Emergence is at nine percent, behind 23 percent last year and 27 percent average.
 
In Minnesota, dry bean planting is at 64 percent, compared to 38 percent last week. That pace is behind last year at 78 percent and the five-year average of 77 percent. Emergence is at 18 percent, well behind 41 percent last year and 36 percent average.
 
USDA is reporting 81 percent of Montana dry beans are planted, and 70 percent of the crop is planted in Idaho. In Oregon, planting is at percent, and 88 percent of dry beans are planted in Washington. Wyoming dry bean farmers have 27 percent of the crop planted, and planting is at five percent in Colorado.
 
Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.

Trade Assistance Package Provides Support for Dry Bean Industry

U.S. dry bean growers and producers feeling the impact of ongoing global trade disruptions will soon feel relief with USDA’s announcement of a new assistance package. Dry beans are included in a list of over 20 crops that will receive a payment through USDA’s Market Facilitation Program for 2019.

“While we remain hopeful that we can soon reach deals to resume trade flows, we are very grateful for this support from the administration through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to help our industry stay productive during this challenging time,” says U.S. Dry Bean Council President Deon Maasjo of Oakes, North Dakota. “Our public/private partnership with USDA remains strong and we remain committed to working through this together,”

In this week’s Dry Bean Scene, U.S. Dry Bean Council Executive Director Rebecca Bratter shares more details on the new trade aid package.

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

Compared to a week ago, trading activity was slow with very light demand. Contract product is moving steady. View the report here.

USDA Crop Progress- May 27

North Dakota farmers made planting progress over the last week, with 3.5 days fit for fieldwork. Dry bean plantings are reported at 49 percent, compared to 23 percent last week. That is behind 56 percent last year and 50 percent average. Emergence is at one percent, near four percent last year.
 
Minnesota farmers had two days of suitable fieldwork the past week. Dry bean plantings are at 38 percent, compared to 14 percent. That pace is behind last year at 54 percent and the five-year average of 53 percent. Emergence is at eight percent, in line with seven percent last year.
 
USDA is reporting 63 percent Montana dry bean crop is planted, compared to 55 percent one week ago. Sixty percent of the crop is planted in Idaho, behind last year’s pace of 97 percent. In Oregon, planting is at 55 percent, and 63 percent of dry beans are planted in Washington. Wyoming dry bean farmers have15 percent of the crop planted, and planting is at four percent in Colorado.
 
Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.