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Tool Available to Weigh PP Decisions

NDSU Extension has developed a spreadsheet to help farmers evaluate prevented planting decisions. “Producers in North Dakota are waiting for fields to dry out so they can start field work and crop planting,” says Andrew Swenson, NDSU Extension farm management specialist. “Though it is early, once planting starts rapid progress can be made with today’s large equipment. Now may be a good time to evaluate the economics of prevented planting, so a timely decision can be made if weather events delay planting to the crop insurance final planting date.” The program uses partial budget to compare the economics of PP with either late planting the crop or planting some other crop. The analysis also considers crop insurance indemnities.

Dry Bean Plantings Estimated to Rise

According to the USDA Prospective Planting report, U.S. farmers intend to plant 1.37 million acres of dry edible beans in 2020. That is up 7 percent from the previous year’s 1.29 million acres. Planted area is expected to be above last year in all estimating states except California. Minnesota farmers intend to plant 215,000 acres of dry beans in 2020. That is an increase from 210,000 acres the previous growing season. In North Dakota, dry bean planting intentions are also expected to increase with USDA estimates coming in at 650,000 acres. When compared to 2019, that is an increase of 6 percent from 615,000 acres

Beans with Spring Greens

Greens like arugula, spinach and watercress are at their freshest in early spring, even when there is still frost in the air. Enjoy them with pink or pinto beans in this fast recipe that is packed with the flavors of spring. Discover the recipe here.

Dry Bean Scene

Farmers are planning for the 2020 crop. Leeds, North Dakota farmer Eric Jorgenson says despite some challenges, the outlook for dry beans remains positive. Get the details in the latest Dry Bean Scene from the Northarvest Bean Growers Association on the Red River Farm Network.

Farmers Waiting to Start Fieldwork

The recent snow and rain has delayed spring fieldwork. At Hatton, North Dakota, Dean Nelson of Kelly Bean Company says the area received around an inch of rain in the latest system. “Prior to that, I hadn’t really seen anybody out doing fieldwork in the immediate area.”

Nelson says farmers are anxiously waiting for a planting window. Once warmer weather arrives, corn will be the first crop to go into the ground. “I know farmers would really like to get it planted in the first couple weeks of May. We can plant dry beans and soybeans into the second week of June, so I don’t foresee much impacted there.”

Dry Bean Scene

Farmers across North Dakota and Minnesota are beginning spring fieldwork. Get the details in this week’s Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network, made possible by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

USDA Crop Progress – April 22

North Dakota farmers are planting crops in the western part of the state. However, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service says, on average, farmers intend to begin fieldwork closer to May. Topsoil moisture rates at 91 percent adequate to surplus.
 
Snowmelt and receding floodwaters are causing saturated cropland across Minnesota. In the southern part of the state, farmers are tilling fields and applying fertilizer with some planting noted. USDA reports half a day suitable for fieldwork last week.
 
Farmers ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Wyoming and Colorado have begun the 2019 planting season. At this time, no dry bean plantings have been reported by USDA. Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.