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Extreme Drought Encompasses 85% of North Dakota

All of North Dakota is now experiencing either abnormally dry or some form of drought conditions. Extreme drought conditions increased 2% this past week. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor puts nearly 85% of the state in that category. 63% of Minnesota has good moisture, with the far southern and northwestern areas either abnormally dry or in moderate drought. The exception comes in Kittson and Marshall counties, where there is severe drought.
 
Check out the Drought Monitor.

Drought Conditions Expand in North Dakota

Extreme drought conditions in North Dakota increased seven percent this past week. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor puts 82 percent of the state in that category. The remaining 18 percent is experiencing some form of dryness. The majority of Minnesota has sufficient moisture, with far southern and northwestern areas either abnormally dry or in moderate drought. Compared to last week, there was a 10 percent increase in moderate and abnormally dry conditions. The exception comes in Kittson County where there is severe drought.

Check out the Drought Monitor.

Crop Progress Report – April 26, 2021

In North Dakota, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service there were 4.6 days suitable for field work last week. Topsoil moisture supplies declined 2% to 80% very short-to-short, and subsoil moisture is pinned at 78% very short-to-short. 22% of spring wheat is seeded, ahead of 10% average, with 2% emerged. Corn plantings are unchanged at 3%, and canola seeding is just beginning at 1%. The planting progress for sugarbeets is 15% complete, 14% for barley, 8% for dry edible peas and 4% for potatoes.

Farmers found 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Minnesota. Spring wheat seeding is one week ahead of last year’s pace at 19% complete. That’s an increase of 9% from last week. Corn planting is 18% complete, behind 34% last year but equal to average. 42% percent of oats, 28% of sugarbeets and 12% of barley and potatoes are in the ground. Topsoil moisture is 75% adequate-to-surplus, and subsoil moisture is rated at 71% adequate-to-surplus.

Dry edible bean planting has begun in western growing regions. Idaho is 14% planted, Washington is at 60% and Montana is at 5%.

Get the latest Crop Progress Report.

Dry Bean Scene

While dry bean planting is still a few weeks away, the cool and dry soil conditions continue to be a concern for farmers in North Dakota and Minnesota. Hear more in the latest Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network, made possible by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Very Little Relief from Dry Conditions

There was little relief from drought conditions across the Northern Plains this past week. Three-quarters of North Dakota remains in extreme drought. The far southeastern corner of the state is abnormally dry, while a narrow band spanning from the Red River Valley and west is in moderate and severe drought. The majority of Minnesota has sufficient moisture, with far southern and northwestern areas either abnormally dry or in moderate drought. The exception comes in Kittson County where there is severe drought.
 

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

USDA Market News puts the grower price for black beans unchanged in North Dakota and Minnesota at $27-to-$32 per hundredweight. Pinto bean prices are holding steady at $30 per hundredweight, and navies are at $32. Kidney bean prices remain at $40 to $46 per hundredweight for lights and darks. Dry beans under contract are moving at a steady pace with current crop prices steady with moderate demand. According to report contacts, rail cars, trucks and containers are still difficult to source.
 

Crop Progress Report – April 19, 2021

In North Dakota, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service says there were just over 2.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 19. Topsoil moisture is rated 78% short to very short, and subsoil moisture is rated 77% short to very short. 13% of spring wheat is seeded, and corn planting is underway at 3% complete. Sugarbeets, oats, barley, dry edible peas and potatoes are also in the ground.
 
Snow and rain also limited Minnesota farmers to 2.5 days of fieldwork last week. However, spring wheat seeding is 10 days ahead of last year’s pace. 29% of oats are planted, along with 6%of barley and 5% of potatoes. Topsoil moisture is 78% adequate-to-surplus, and subsoil moisture is rated at 70% adequate-to-surplus.
 

Dry in the West, Wet in the East

Rain and snow helped alleviate dry conditions across much of the Northern Plains, but extreme drought conditions worsened inareas not receiving this moisture. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor shows extreme drought conditions in North Dakota worsening to reflect growing moisture deficits. That extreme drought now covers 76 percent of the state, an increase of six percentage points from the previous week. Sargent and Richland Counties had a slight improvement in dry conditions. In Minnesota, locally heavy rainfall in the last week brought a two-category improvement in dryness across the western side of the state. There is also no more extreme drought in Kittson County.
 

Crop Progress Report – April 12, 2021

In North Dakota, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service says there were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending April 11. Topsoil moisture is rated 83 percent short to very short, and subsoil moisture is rated 80 percent short to very short. Minnesota farmers had 2.4 days suitable for fieldwork dur the week ending April 11. Topsoil moisture is rated 64 percent adequate with pasture conditions rated 79 percent fair to good.