Crop Progress Report – Sept. 20, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated 15% very poor, 30% poor, 39% fair, 16% good, and 0% excellent. Dropping leaves was 95%, near 96% last year, and equal to average. Harvested was 57%, ahead of 51% last year and 49% average. Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were 0% very short, 34% short, 34% adequate, and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 43% very short, 33% short, 23% adequate, and 1% surplus. In Minnesota, dry beans rated 19% very poor, 24% poor, 46% fair, 19% good, and 2% excellent. Dropping leaves was 95%, near both 92% last year and average. Harvested was 52%, ahead of 42% last year and 48% average. Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were rated 11% very short, 24% short, 61% adequate and 4% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 19% very short, 37% short, 43% adequate and 1% surplus. Dry beans were 90% harvested in Montana (including Chickpeas), 73% in Idaho, 91% in Washington, 63% in Colorado, 49% in Nebraska, 30% in Wyoming and 49% in Michigan. Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

Dry Bean Scene

Dry bean harvest is underway in Minnesota and North Dakota. In this week’s Dry Bean Scene, hear from New Rockford, ND farmer Jeff Schafer and Stephen, MN farmer Betsy Jensen. This radio update is made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Early Dry Bean Harvest is a Mixed Bag

The edible bean market is poised for below average production, judging by the prices, which still are strong as farmers begin their harvest, said Tim Courneya, Northarvest Bean Growers executive vice president.
 
“They aren’t backing off,” he said. “We planted enough beans to be a little more bearish but the markets are bulled up.”
 
A few elevator Courneya called in early September were offering prices for navy beans that were in the high $30s per hundredweight and one had a price of $41 per hundredweight.
 

Crop Progress Report – Sept. 13, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated 16% very poor, 30% poor, 37% fair, 16% good, and 1% excellent. Dropping leaves was 93%, ahead of 88% last year, and near 89% average. Harvested was 39%, ahead of 26% last year and 32% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were 28% very short, 36% short, 34% adequate, and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 42% very short, 32% short, 25% adequate, and 1% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans rated 12% very poor, 24% poor, 45% fair, 17% good, and 2% excellent. Dropping leaves was 91%, ahead of 82% last year and 84% average. Harvested was 35%, ahead of 19% last year and 26% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were rated 15% very short, 28% short, 55% adequate and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 22% very short, 40% short, 37% adequate and 1% surplus.
 
Dry beans were 85% harvested in Montana (including chickpeas), 60% harvested in Idaho, 81% in Washington, 35% in Colorado, 34% in Nebraska, 22% in Wyoming and 6% in Michigan. Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

Dry Bean Scene

 
Dry bean harvest is underway in Minnesota and North Dakota. In this week’s Dry Bean Scene, Jared Hagert of Emerado, North Dakota and crop consultant Mark Huso provide a harvest update. This radio update is made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.
 

Sample Dry Beans for Cyst Nematode

We recommend that dry edible bean growers soil sample their fields for soybean cyst nematode (SCN). This is particularly important in Southeastern and East Central
North Dakota, where SCN is most commonly found in the state.
 
Like soybeans, dry edible beans are susceptible to SCN. Also like soybeans, above-ground symptoms of infected dry edible beans are not diagnostic for SCN.
 
Infected dry edible beans may only appear stunted, yellowed and have poor canopy closure (Figure 1). SCN can be observed on the roots, but as plants age it is
increasingly difficult to identify (Figure 2). Consequently, soil sampling is the best way to test for the nematode.
 
Methods to sample dry edible bean fields for SCN are the same as soybeans. Sampling can be done anytime now until freeze-up. Using a soil probe (or shovel), take 10-20 subsamples per field, 6-8 inches deep, aiming for the roots. Mix the sample and submit to a lab. If you do not know if you have SCN, sample area where SCN is most
likely to be first introduced such as field entrances (on equipment with soil), periodically flooded areas (with flood water) or near shelter belts (dispersed with blowing soil).
 
Sampling high pH soils is also a good area to sample, as high pH favors SCN reproduction. If you already know you have SCN, understanding your egg levels will help you make management decisions next year.
 
Research conducted at NDSU demonstrated that different market classes of dry beans have different susceptibility to SCN. SCN was able to feed and reproduce on kidneys beans just as successfully as a susceptible soybean. SCN was able to feed and reproduce on pinto and navy beans, but at a reduced rate when compared to susceptible soybeans.
 
Among all the market classes tested, feeding and reproduction was lowest on black beans. It is notable however, that differences among varieties within the market classes exist. If we were to use a soybean scale to compare the market classes, results would suggest that Kidneys would be rated ‘S’, pintos and navys ‘S/MS/MR”, and blacks ‘MR’.
For more information on SCN biology, SCN distribution in ND, and SCN sampling, please see my articles from last week.
 
(Source: Sam Markell, plant pathologist, NDSU Extension)
Grady Thorsgard - Harvest (black and pinto)

Dry Bean Scene

Dry bean harvest is underway in Minnesota and North Dakota, about 3-4 weeks ahead of schedule in some cases. In this week’s Dry Bean Scene, Norm Krause of Staples, Minnesota and Tom Kennelly of Grafton, North Dakota provide harvest update. This radio program is made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Updates Made to CFAP 2.0

USDA is amending the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2.0 (CFAP 2.0) payment calculation for sales-based commodities, which are primarily comprised of specialty crops, to allow producers to substitute 2018 sales for 2019 sales. All new and modified applications must be completed by October 12.

Potassium Deficiency Symptoms in Dry Beans and Soybeans

Along with many other challenges associated with dry conditions this crop season, potassium (K) deficiency symptoms are being expressed in crops including dry bean and soybean. The image shows K deficiency symptoms in pinto bean from the Carrington REC dryland dry bean variety trial. The dry bean plants have been translocating K from older leaves to upper leaves and pods for seed development, and plants lacking sufficient K are displaying leaves with yellow or chlorotic edges.
 
Extended dry soil conditions reduce K availability, with deficiency symptoms likely with soil K levels below soil test critical values and especially with soil clay chemistry having smectite-to-illite ratio greater than 3.5.
 
In addition to the fixation/retention of K in smectitic clay interlayers, the lack of soil water forces plant roots to only encounter K through direct contact or diffusion. Both of these processes limit the volume of soil with possible plant-available K that can be taken up. In moist soils, K is released from smectitic clays and some K movement is possible with soil water to the roots.
 
Details on K management (soil testing and K fertilizer application) can be found in NDSU Extension circular ND Fertilizer Recommendation Tables and Equations.
 
(Source: Greg Endres and Dave Franzen, NDSU Extension)

Early Look at Mexican Dry Bean Harvest Suggests Planting Decreases

The U.S. Dry Bean Council’s 2021 Mexico Dry Bean Prospective Planting Assessment is underway. The main dry bean production states for the spring/summer harvest. A cursory first look at planting data submitted by consultants indicates the following:
  • Chihuahua: Planting is complete and is down almost 50% from average and from official government planting intentions. 80% of the beans were planted during the critical planting period and most are in good to excellent condition, as of this reporting.
  • Durango: Planting has ended in most areas and appears to be down around 25% from average with 70% of the beans planted late, after July 15 and now dependent on soil moisture. Bean plants are in the growing stage and appear mostly good to excellent. This area is mostly pinto Saltillo beans.
  • Zacatecas: Planting is complete and is down around 15% down from the average. In this case, beans were planted late due to excess rain and moisture. Bean plants look mostly good to excellent. This area is mostly black beans.  
The complete planting intentions update will be available in another week; these are only initial observations.