Crop Progress Report – October 12, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean harvest in North Dakota was 90%. That behind 95% last year, but ahead of 80% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were 27% very short, 27% short, 41% adequate, and 5% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 36% very short, 29% short, 32% adequate, and 3% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans harvested was 92%. That’s equal to 96% last year and ahead of 88% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were 4 percent very short, 21 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 11 percent very short, 36 percent short, 51 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.
 
Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

Dry Bean Scene

Farmers are trying to wrap up dry bean harvest, but the lack of a hard frost is making for tough cutting conditions. Hear more from Rock and Roll Agronomy owner Jason Hanson and North Dakota Agricultural Weather Network Director Daryl Ritchison in this week’s Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network. This radio update is made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.
 

Fertilizer Decisions

With fertilizer prices skyrocketing, University of Minnesota Extension Nutrient Management Specialist Dan Kaiser is fielding fertilizer application questions.

“One of those questions is about starter fertilizer. Farmers want to know if they can do in-furrow alone. It all depends on starting soil test values, to know where you’re at. With low soil tests, we know starter alone isn’t going to do it, we’ll need a broadcast fertilizer. A combination of the two can reduce costs.”

Specialty products could be an option, but Kaiser says be very careful with those.

“The only time I’ve seen the benefits of those is when we’ve seen wet soils that respond to side-dress nitrogen applications. If you’re looking at bio-stimulants as a way to trim back some of the costs, be careful and look at the data.”

Read more.

Latest Drought Monitor Shows Improved Conditions

There’s been a slight improvement in dry conditions in the last week across North Dakota and Minnesota. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, the line of extreme drought in northwest Minnesota declined in Polk, Red Lake and Pennington Counties. Last week’s rains in portions of North Dakota also reduced the severity of the drought. Yet the above-normal temperatures in the last week do not help the areas that have been in a long-term drought.

Crop Progress Report – October 4, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean harvest in North Dakota was 83%. That behind 88% last year, but ahead of 73% average.

Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were 35% very short, 37% short, 27% adequate, and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 47% very short, 30% short, 22% adequate, and 1% surplus.

In Minnesota, dry beans harvested was 86%. That’s equal to 86% last year and ahead of 81% average.

Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were 7 percent very short, 24 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated

15 percent very short, 37 percent short, 47 percent adequate and 1 percent surplus.

Dry beans were 81% in Idaho, 86% in Colorado, 72% in Nebraska, 98% in Wyoming and 84% in Michigan. Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

U.S. Senate Approves $10 Billion in Disaster Assistance

The U.S. Senate has approved $10 billion in disaster assistance. Specifically, it includes $9.25 billion in aid for farmers who suffered losses due to drought, floods and other qualifying disasters. The funding will extend WHIP= to cover losses in calendar years 2020 and 2021. Read more.

Dry Bean Scene

Johnstown Bean Company general manager Dylan Karley joins this week’s Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network. While pinto and black bean yields have been coming in below normal, a bright spot have been favorable harvest conditions. This radio update is made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Crop Progress Report – Sept. 27, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean harvest in North Dakota was 73%. That’s near 71% last year and ahead of 63% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were 32% very short, 39% short, 28% adequate, and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 41% very short, 35% short, 23% adequate, and 1% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans harvested was 72%. That’s ahead of 67% last year and 69% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were 9% very short, 24% short, 65% adequate and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 17% very short, 37% short, 45% adequate and 1% surplus.
 
Dry beans were 96% harvested in Montana (including Chickpeas), 81% in Idaho, 95% in Washington, 74% in Colorado, 63% in Nebraska, 74% in Wyoming and 64% in Michigan. Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

Dry Bean Scene

In this week’s Dry Bean Scene, hear harvest updates from both North Dakota and Michigan. This radio update is made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.
 

Gov. Walz Announces $10 Million in Drought Relief

Today, Governor Tim Walz announced a $10 million drought relief package to support Minnesota farmers and livestock producers impacted by severe drought conditions during the 2021 growing season.

“Historic drought conditions have created extreme stress and financial hardship for our farmers and livestock producers during an already difficult time for the agricultural industry,” said Governor Walz. “As governor, and as someone who grew up on a family farm, I stand with our farmers. This funding will provide much-needed relief to Minnesota’s agricultural community and help ensure our farmers can keep feeding Minnesota and the world.”

The Governor’s proposal includes $5 million in rapid response grants to provide drought relief for livestock producers and specialty crop producers. Examples of eligible costs include water handling equipment such as water tanks, pipeline, and water wagons, water hauling, wells, and irrigation equipment.

The funding proposal also includes $5 million for the Rural Finance Authority’s Disaster Recovery Loan Program. The Rural Finance Authority’s Disaster Recovery Loan Program makes zero-interest loans available immediately for Minnesota farmers whose operations are suffering from lack of rain. The Disaster Recovery Loan Program can be used to help cover lost revenue or expenses not covered by insurance.

More details on the drought relief package will be announced soon.

This summer, Governor Walz met with agricultural leaders across the state to hear how the drought has impacted them. Governor Walz also met with President Joe Biden and USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack to ask that all levels of government work together to address the impacts of this drought on Minnesota’s farmers.