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Dry Bean Scene

Farmers are making planting progress. Northarvest Bean Growers Association Past President Tom Kennelly, who farms at Grafton, ND, is putting dry beans in the ground. Get the details in the Dry Bean Scene, made possible by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Crop Progress – May 6

North Dakota farmers made planting progress over the last week, with reports of wheat, corn, canola and other crops being planted. Dry bean plantings are reported at one percent, unchanged from the previous week and near two percent average.
 
Just two days were suitable for fieldwork in Minnesota, but farmers across the state made progress with fertilizer application and planting. A few reports of dry beans going into the ground were received.
 
Farmers ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Michigan have begun the 2019 planting season. USDA is reporting 15 percent of the Montana dry bean crop is planted, compared to six percent one week ago. Wyoming dry bean farmers also began planting with one percent complete.
 
Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.

Farmers Waiting to Start Fieldwork

The recent snow and rain has delayed spring fieldwork. At Hatton, North Dakota, Dean Nelson of Kelly Bean Company says the area received around an inch of rain in the latest system. “Prior to that, I hadn’t really seen anybody out doing fieldwork in the immediate area.”

Nelson says farmers are anxiously waiting for a planting window. Once warmer weather arrives, corn will be the first crop to go into the ground. “I know farmers would really like to get it planted in the first couple weeks of May. We can plant dry beans and soybeans into the second week of June, so I don’t foresee much impacted there.”

USDA Crop Progress

North Dakota farmers got a start on fieldwork last week. USDA is reporting progress on wheat, corn and other crops being planted. Dry bean plantings are reported at 1 percent. Just two days were suitable for fieldwork in Minnesota. Farmers across the state made progress on tillage and fertilizer application, with some wheat and corn planting noted.
 
Farmers ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Wyoming, Colorado and Michigan have begun the 2019 planting season. USDA is reporting 6 percent of the Montana dry bean crop is planted. Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.

Dry Bean Scene

Farmers across North Dakota and Minnesota are beginning spring fieldwork. Get the details in this week’s Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network, made possible by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

USDA Crop Progress – April 22

North Dakota farmers are planting crops in the western part of the state. However, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service says, on average, farmers intend to begin fieldwork closer to May. Topsoil moisture rates at 91 percent adequate to surplus.
 
Snowmelt and receding floodwaters are causing saturated cropland across Minnesota. In the southern part of the state, farmers are tilling fields and applying fertilizer with some planting noted. USDA reports half a day suitable for fieldwork last week.
 
Farmers ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Wyoming and Colorado have begun the 2019 planting season. At this time, no dry bean plantings have been reported by USDA. Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.

USDA Crop Progress Reports Begin

A handful of North Dakota farmers have tried to start planting last week. However, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service says, on average, farmers intend to begin fieldwork closer to May. Topsoil moisture is rated 93 percent adequate to surplus.
 
During the week April 8, freezing rain followed by wet snow and high winds further delayed field activities in southern Minnesota. USDA reports some farmers got into the fields to apply fertilizer the week prior to the storm.
 
Farmers ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Wyoming and Colorado have begun the 2019 planting season. At this time, no dry bean plantings have been reported by USDA. Stay up to date on the latest Crop Progress reports by clicking here.

Don’t Rush into Spring Planting

Farmers are pulling out the planters in preparation for the 2019 growing season. CHS Devils Lake Agronomy Sales Manager Jeremy Safranski says planting is about three weeks away for area farmers, five to seven days behind average. “There is some corn and soybeans left in the field from last fall, and a lot of the ground didn’t get worked,” says Safranski.
 
According to Peterson Farms Seed agronomist Adam Spelhaug, farmers in eastern North Dakota should be in the field by the end of the month. “The biggest thing is don’t rush. It pays to wait an extra day or two for the right conditions,”
 
While the planting season may start later than many would have liked, Bayer District Sales Manager Mark Haugland says farmers can’t afford to cut corners. That’s especially true for weed control. “Stick with using pre’s and multiple modes-of-action as we go through the spring,” says Haugland. “I predict we’ll see warmer season weeds showing up earlier, but you’ve got to stick to the plan because there is so much at stake.”