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Dry Bean Planting Progress

The weekly Crop Progress Report from USDA puts dry bean planting in Minnesota is at 46 percent complete. Last week planting was at 27 percent and the five-year average is 51 percent. Dry bean planting in North Dakota has just started at 23 percent complete, compared to 3 percent last week and well behind 48 percent average. The Montana dry bean crop (including chickpeas) is 80 percent planted, an increase from 55 percent last week. In Idaho, 77 percent of the dry bean crop is planted and 59 percent is emerged. Fifty percent of dry beans are planted in Oregon, with 20 percent emerged. Dry bean planting is underway other states at 25 percent in Wyoming, 6 percent complete in Colorado and at 18 percent in Nebraska. View the latest Crop Progress Report here.

Dry Bean Planting Progress

The weekly Crop Progress Report from USDA puts dry bean planting in Minnesota is at 27 percent complete. Last week planting was at 15 percent and the five-year average is 30 percent. Dry bean planting in North Dakota has just started at 3 percent complete, compared to 1 percent last week and 21 percent average. The Montana dry bean crop (including chickpeas) is 55 percent planted, an increase from 35 percent last week.
 
In Idaho, 70 percent of the dry bean crop is planted and 47 percent is emerged. Forty-five percent of dry beans are planted in Oregon. Dry bean planting is just getting started in other states at 1 percent in Wyoming and 2 percent complete in Colorado. View the latest Crop Progress Report here.

Dry Bean Planting Progress

 
The weekly Crop Progress Report from USDA puts dry bean planting (including chickpeas) in Montana at 10 percent complete. That compares to 12 percent last year and 26 percent average. Dry Bean planting in Minnesota is just starting at 6 percent complete. Last year at this time planting was at 1 percent and the five-year average is 3 percent. View the latest Crop Progress Report here.

Dry Bean Planting Underway

The weekly Crop Progress Report from USDA puts dry bean planting (including chickpeas) in Montana at 4 percent complete. That compares to 5 percent last year and 9 percent average. Stay up to date on the latest planting progress here.

Looking Ahead to Mexico’s 2020 Planting Season

The dry bean planting season in Mexico has not begun, but once it does the U.S. Dry Bean Council will provide crop updates. In the meantime, a few considerations reported from the USDBC Mexico City office will help determine the supply demand equation in the year ahead.
 
According to market intelligence in Mexico, there are no real changes to planting surface for dry beans.This comes despite efforts to achieve greater self sufficiency through the “Beans for Mexico” program. Based on information from the Mexican Agricultural Agency (SADER/SIAP), total planting intentions for the upcoming cycle is 1.47 million hectares, almost the same as last year. Retail bean prices have been very high as people are stocking up during the pandemic. This is a change from the downward trend noted in consumption of beans.The dollar/peso exchange rate is up 26 percent to 24 pesos to the dollar.

Tool Available to Weigh PP Decisions

NDSU Extension has developed a spreadsheet to help farmers evaluate prevented planting decisions. “Producers in North Dakota are waiting for fields to dry out so they can start field work and crop planting,” says Andrew Swenson, NDSU Extension farm management specialist. “Though it is early, once planting starts rapid progress can be made with today’s large equipment. Now may be a good time to evaluate the economics of prevented planting, so a timely decision can be made if weather events delay planting to the crop insurance final planting date.” The program uses partial budget to compare the economics of PP with either late planting the crop or planting some other crop. The analysis also considers crop insurance indemnities.

April Crop Production Report Released

USDA released the April Crop Production report on Thursday. Those dry bean productions numbers can be found below.

Mexico Weather Very Dry at Start of Bean Planting

Mexico is currently behind in precipitation for this year’s spring/summer dry bean cycle and experiencing above average temperatures. Planting season in Zacatecas, Durango, Chihuahua, San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato is delayed due to the lack of precipitation. Although planting dates in Zacatecas, Durango and Chihuahua can be extended after the recommended planting season, dry beans will be at the risk of an early frost and erratic rainfall during the growing season. According to Mexican government sources, the programmed production for 2019, is projected to be 50,000 metric tons higher than 2018.
 

Dry Bean Acres Increase in June Acreage Report

According to the June USDA acreage report, area planted for dry beans in 2019 is estimated at 1.31 million acres. That’s up nine percent from 2018 for comparable states. Dry bean area harvested is forecast to total 1.26 million acres. That is also up nine percent from 2018 for comparable states. Four of the nine estimating states show an increase in total dry bean planted acres from last year.

Beginning in 2019, dry bean estimates were discontinued in Montana and Texas. Also beginning in 2019, estimates no longer include chickpeas.

View the full June acreage report.

Dry Bean Scene

In the Perham, Minnesota area, Professional Agronomy Services agronomist Brad Guck says dry bean planting is a wrap and the crop is off to a good start. Get the details in this week’s Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network.