Posts

Research on Dry Bean Row Spacing

Narrower row spacings and higher plant populations are trending in dry bean production. Data from a 2018 dry bean grower survey indicate 39% of black and 44% of navy bean were planted in North Dakota at rates of 110,000 seeds per acre or greater, with the likely goal of establishing at least 100,000 plants per acre. In addition, the survey results record about 70% of black and navy bean in 2018 were planted in row widths ranging from 11 to 25 inches.
 
Based on historic North Dakota work, NDSU recommends an established stand of 90,000 plants per acre for black and navy bean. Research conducted in 1999 to 2000 indicated no seed yield response among black and navy bean planting rates of 90,000, 105,000 and 120,000 pure live seeds (PLS) per acre and a yield increase in one of two years with 7- versus 30-inch row spacings.
 
This publication summarizes NDSU research trials conducted 2014 to 2018 in eastern North Dakota to evaluate potential yield increase of black and navy bean with higher plant populations and narrower rows compared to the traditionally recommended plant density in wide rows. View the research here.

Dry Bean Scene

NDSU Extension is a dry bean production webinar on Wednesday, April 15. Find out more from NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center agronomist Greg Endres in the Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network.

Dry Bean Scene

NDSU Extension has published research on plant population and row spacing for navy and black beans. Now researchers are working on furthering that information for pinto beans. Find out more in the Dry Bean Scene, made possible by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Pinto Beans Respond to Phosphorus Start Fertilizer

Phosphorus-based starter fertilizer can increase pinto bean seed yield. That’s according to Greg Endres, North Dakota State University Extension cropping systems specialist.
 
That finding is the result of nearly a decade of NDSU phosphorus-based starter fertilizer trials conducted at the Carrington Research Extension Center. The trials evaluated pinto bean response primarily with liquid 10-34-0 fertilizer applied using different methods and rates in loam soil generally testing low in phosphorus.
 
Research highlights include:
  • Pinto bean seed yield increased more than 3 hundredweight (cwt) per acre with in-furrow (IF, meaning fertilizer placed directly with seed) -applied 10-34-0 at 2 to 3 gallons per acre (gpa), compared with the untreated check.
  • Yield was similar with IF- and band-applied (2 inches horizontally placed from planted seed) 10-34-0 at 3 to 6 gpa, although the plant population was reduced with IF application.
  • Broadcast or midrow (centered between 22- or 30-inch rows) band-applied 10-34-0 did not increase yield.
  • Yield was similar between low (2.5 to 3 gpa) and high (5 to 6 gpa) rates of IF-applied 10-34-0. The high fertilizer rate reduced the plant population.
  • The plant population and yield were similar between IF-applied 10-34-0 and the low-salt fertilizer 6-24-6.
 
More information about this research is available in NDSU Extension publication “Pinto Bean Response to Phosphorus Starter Fertilizer in East-central North Dakota.”