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Is It Too Late for the Mexico Crop?

Over the past few weeks, the U.S. Dry Bean Council has been reporting dry conditions in Mexico dry bean growing regions and offering projections about the potential impact on this year’s production levels. A lack of rain occurred during a critical time in the planting process. Therefore, most reporting, combined with the observations of an USDBC agronomist, make it increasingly certain that lack of planting, late planting and late rains will all affect production levels. Read more.

Dry Bean Scene

Located in northeast North Dakota, the Pembina County dry bean crop has been enduring very dry conditions this growing season. Get the details from M-R Consulting owner Mark Ramsey in the Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network. It’s made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Dry Conditions Persist in Northern North Dakota

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, dry conditions still persistent in the northern tier counties of North Dakota. Northern Pierce and Benson counties, located in the north central part of the state, remain in D1 or moderate drought. That area of moderate drought did expand into northeast McHenry County this week. A small area in northeast Minnesota encompassing Saint Louis, Itasca and Aitkin counties is also abnormally dry, as well as the western edge of Kittson and Marshall counties in northwest Minnesota.
 

Mexico Weather Very Dry at Start of Bean Planting

Mexico is currently behind in precipitation for this year’s spring/summer dry bean cycle and experiencing above average temperatures. Planting season in Zacatecas, Durango, Chihuahua, San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato is delayed due to the lack of precipitation. Although planting dates in Zacatecas, Durango and Chihuahua can be extended after the recommended planting season, dry beans will be at the risk of an early frost and erratic rainfall during the growing season. According to Mexican government sources, the programmed production for 2019, is projected to be 50,000 metric tons higher than 2018.
 

Dry Conditions Linger in the Canadian Prairies

A substantial part of the Canadian Prairies remains dry, as near drought conditions linger. Glacier Farm Media Director of Markets and Weather Bruce Burnett says some areas of the western prairies are in their third year of limited moisture. “We had a dry winter with drought conditions last fall in the southern two-thirds of the prairies. We’ve had virtually no soil moisture recharge in the past two years,” says Burnett.

Timely rains are needed to sustain the crop. “To get an average crop this year, we need frequent rains. We haven’t seen that yet this growing season. If we remain dry through June, there will be a lot of stress to crops and the yield potential will drop significantly.”