Dry Bean Scene

In this week’s Dry Bean Scene, North Dakota State University Extension Plant Pathologist Sam Markell tells dry bean growers what they should be scouting for in their fields. The Dry Bean Scene is brought to you, in part, by Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Northarvest Beangrower Magazine changes publishers

Hello & thanks for clicking!

Northarvest Beangrower Magazine is changing publishers.

While we at Northarvest Bean Growers Association have enjoyed our publishing partnership with Red River Farm Network for many years, they’ve chosen to bow out of print publishing. RRFN has done great work over the past 18(!) years and Northarvest very much appreciates all the effort put in by so many since the start of our magazine. NBGA is pleased to share that we will continue to work together with RRFN on our weekly radio segment, the Dry Bean Scene, as well as other projects.  

Moving forward, Northarvest Bean Growers Association is excited to announce a new partnership with Agweek for our print magazine.

Interviews are taking place, stories are being written, photos are being taken and our advertisers are being contacted. If you haven’t heard from us yet, you will shortly – though feel free to shoot us an email with any questions .

While we normally see an issue out for delivery around June, with the change of publishing duties, we expect the first magazine from our new partners to start arriving in subscribers’ mailboxes near the end of July/early August, depending on printing availability & USPS delivery speed.

Thanks for reading & please feel free to reach out with any questions. 

  • Jed Brazier
    Communications & Marketing Director, NBGA
    jed@northarvestbean.org

’22 Financials Pencil Out With Good Yields

The crop put in the ground in 2022 will likely be the most expensive to date in a farmer’s career. Northland Community and Technical College Farm Business Management Instructor Ron Dvergsten says the financials still work. “It kind of reminds me of 2011-2012 when input costs were high, too,” said Dvergsten. “I’ve run some budgets this fall and it doesn’t leave a lot of wiggle room, but it does work if we get normal yield.” Many farmers were able to capture strong cash prices for this year’s crop. Dvergsten is advising his clients to also consider making sales for the 2022 crop. “Look at locking in 25-to-40 percent of your projected bushels between now and sometime next spring to give you a little buffer. Most likely, you’ll be putting more cost per acre into your farm in 2022 than you ever have in your farming history.”

Crop Progress Report – September 7, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated 16% very poor, 35% poor, 33% fair, 16% good, and 0% excellent. Dropping leaves was 87%, ahead of 74% last year and 76% average. Harvested was 14%, near 10% last year and 18% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were rated 29% very short, 34% short, 35% adequate, and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 42% very short, 33% short, 24% adequate, and 1% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans rated 12% very poor, 24% poor, 45% fair, 17% good, and 2% excellent. Dropping leaves was 79%, ahead of 59% last year and 62% average. Harvested was 10%, near 9% last year and equal to 10% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were rated 15% very short, 26% short, 54% adequate and 5% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 22% very short, 37%
short, 40% adequate and 1% surplus.
 
Get the latest Crop Progress numbers.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

USDA Market News reports that grower prices remain firm as harvest progresses. Though trade activity is slowly increasing, trade remains mostly light with mixed demand. Cooler temperatures and increased rainfall has been reported across many of the growing region.
 
Grower prices for black beans in North Dakota and Minnesota are at $44-to-$45 per hundredweight (cwt). Pinto bean prices are at $43-to-$45 per cwt. Navy beans are at $37-to-$41 per cwt. Dark red and light red kidney bean prices are at $47-to-$48 per cwt.
 

Crop Progress Report – August 30, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated rated 17% very poor, 33% poor, 35% fair, 14% good, and 1% excellent. Dropping leaves was 72%, well ahead of 45% last year, and ahead of 56% average. Harvested was 6%, near 2% last year and 7% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were rated 27% very short, 36% short, 36% adequate, and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 45% very short, 34% short, 20% adequate, and 1% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans rated 12% very poor, 24% poor, 45% fair, 17% good, and 2% excellent. Dropping leaves was 58%, ahead of 40% last year and 35% average. Harvested was 3%.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were rated 20% very short, 28% short, 46% adequate and 6% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 30% very short, 39% short, 30% adequate and 1% surplus.
 
Get the latest Crop Progressnumbers.

Crop Progress Report – August 23, 2021

According to USDA’s Crop Progress Report, dry edible bean condition in North Dakota rated18% very poor, 33% poor, 35% fair, 13% good, and 1%
excellent. Setting pods was 95%, ahead of 87% last year, and near 94% average. Dropping leaves was 40%, well ahead of 19% last year, and ahead of 35% average. Harvested was 1%.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in North Dakota were rated 31% very short, 44% short, 25% adequate, and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 49% very short, 38% short, 13% adequate, and 0% surplus.
 
In Minnesota, dry beans rated 12% very poor, 23% poor, 46% fair, 17% good, and 2% excellent. Dropping leaves was 41%, ahead of 27% last year and 15% average.
 
Topsoil moisture supplies in Minnesota were rated 44% very short, 38% short, 18% adequate and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 44% very short, 39% short, 17% adequate and 0% surplus.
 
Get the latest Crop Progress numbers

Retaliatory Tariff Removal Discussions Press Forward

Since June 2018, the European Union (EU) has applied 25% retaliatory tariffs on the import of select U.S. agricultural products, including dry beans. The tariffs were applied in response to a Section 232 case that resulted in the application of tariffs on imports of European steel and aluminum. 
 
Almost since the day the tariffs went into effect, the U.S. Dry Bean Council (USDBC) has been advocating for their removal. Earlier this month, the United Kingdom government announced its determination at the conclusion of the commentary period to remove dry beans from the retaliation list. This is expected to take three to four months.
 
At the same time, during several conferences held between U.S. and EU trade authorities on the sidelines of the recent G-7 meeting in the UK, EU trade authorities also announced their optimism that the tariff dispute will be resolved by years’ end.
 
While there are still details to confirm and some more work to be done, indications are the by the end of 2021 the 25% retaliatory tariffs on imports of U.S. dry beans to the UK and the EU will be removed. The USDBC will continue to monitor and report on this situation as soon as final determinations are issued.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

The dry beans under contract are moving at a steady pace. According to report contacts, rail cars and containers are getting harder to source. USDA Market News puts the grower price for black beans this past week was $27 to $32 per hundredweight (cwt). Pinto beans range from $30 to $32 per cwt. Navies are at $32 per cwt. Kidney bean prices also remain steady at $34 to $43 per cwt for lights and darks. View the USDA Weekly Market Review for March 2.

Weekly Dry Bean Market Review

The dry beans under contract are moving at a steady pace. USDA Market News says the grower price for black beans this past week was $25 to $29 per hundredweight (cwt). Pinto beans range from $28 to $30 per cwt. Navies are at $28 per cwt. Kidney bean prices also remain steady at $34 to $43 per cwt for lights and darks. View the USDA Weekly Market Review for January 19.