USDA Purchases Packaged and Canned Beans

Dry edible beans and canned beans have been purchased by USDA for distribution to the child nutrition and other related domestic food assistance program for Fiscal Year 2019. The purchase includes packaged pinto, baby lima, Great Northern and light red kidney beans, pinto bean totes and canned garbanzo beans, totaling over $1.08 million.

View the purchase.

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

According to the Weekly Dry Bean Market News report, grower prices for North Dakota and Minnesota remain mostly unchanged this week. Dry bean trading activity remains limited with very light demand. Contract product is moving steady.

View the report.

Jon Ihry

Dry Bean Production Forecast Cut in August Report

According to the August USDA Crop Production Report, production of dry edible beans is forecast at 24.6 million hundredweight, down 34 percent from 2018. Area planted is estimated at 1.33 million acres. That’s up two percent from the previous forecast, but down 36 percent from 2018. Area harvested is forecast at 1.28 million acres, up two percent from the previous forecast, but 36 percent below 2018. The average U.S. dry bean yield is forecast at 1,919 pounds per acre, an increase of 59 pounds from last season.

View the August Crop Production Report.

 

*Beginning in 2019, estimates no longer include chickpeas.

Navy Beans Purchased by USDA

Navy beans have been purchased for use in the USDA Trade Mitigation Food Purchase and Distribution Program, valued at over $3.5 million. View the purchase.

FSA Administrator Visits ND to Discuss MFP Payments

USDA Farm Service Agency Administrator Richard Fordyce paid a visit to North Dakota, meeting with farmers, agriculture organizations and other state leaders. The trip was prompted by North Dakota Senator John Hoeven to discuss details of the new Market Facilitation Program payments. This was the first roundtable event for the Administrator with farmers regarding the payments.
 
Farmers are still curious as to how the county rates were determined. Fordyce said in order to get payments out sooner rather than later, USDA had to come up with a calculation that didn’t require taking a crop to harvest. “It’s based on acres of crops that were planted in that county, the average yields of those crops times a number by commodity,” said Fordyce. “For example, if there was a county that experienced a weather anomaly within the last three years, that would impact the county yield number.”
 
Hear more and read more about Fordyce’s visit.

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

Dry bean trading activity remains limited with very light demand. This week is a transition from old crop to new crop for peas, lentils and garbs. Weather is a big factor for the next month and a half for dry beans before harvest starts. According to USDA’s Weekly Dry Bean Market News, grower prices for North Dakota and Minnesota remain mostly unchanged this week.
 

U.S. Dry Bean Council Holds Summer Board Meeting

The U.S. Dry Bean Council’s summer board meeting took place July 19 and 20 in Snowmass, Colorado in conjunction with the U.S. Dry Bean Convention. This year’s meeting focused on USDBC’s response to the current trade environment and the downturn in global exports.
 
The Agricultural Affairs and International Promotion Committees both discussed and defined several new approaches to shoring up global markets and expressing industry policy priorities. That includes another Washington D.C. Fly-In in the spring of 2020, and the implementation of several new trade opportunities under the new Agricultural Trade Promotion program.
 

Mexico Weather Very Dry at Start of Bean Planting

Mexico is currently behind in precipitation for this year’s spring/summer dry bean cycle and experiencing above average temperatures. Planting season in Zacatecas, Durango, Chihuahua, San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato is delayed due to the lack of precipitation. Although planting dates in Zacatecas, Durango and Chihuahua can be extended after the recommended planting season, dry beans will be at the risk of an early frost and erratic rainfall during the growing season. According to Mexican government sources, the programmed production for 2019, is projected to be 50,000 metric tons higher than 2018.
 

Promising Niche Market Opportunities in Peru

The U.S. Dry Bean Council recently concluded a fact-finding mission to Peru. U.S. agricultural exports to Peru increased from $424 million in 2008 to $1.3 billion in 2018. Currently, the U.S. is the largest agricultural product supplier with 31 percent market share. About two-thirds of U.S. agricultural goods enter the country duty free, including dry beans. In marketing year 2017/18, the U.S. exported 4,147 metric tons of dry beans to Peru. This is due primarily to lower Peruvian dry bean production and increased demand for navy beans for food assistance programs, which drove up U.S. exports.
 

Weekly Dry Bean Market News

Dry bean trading activity remains limited with very light demand. Slow movement has been the trend, though new crop is starting to be harvested in some areas. According to USDA’s Weekly Dry Bean Market News, grower prices for North Dakota and Minnesota remain mostly unchanged this week.