Dry Bean Scene

It’s never too early to starting scouting and treating for disease in dry edible beans. According to NDSU Extension plant pathologist Sam Markell, white mold and rust are two common diseases farmers should look for. Get the full details in the Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network, made possible in part by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Dry Bean Prices Higher Compared to One Year Ago

USDA released their Agricultural Prices Report on June 30. The price comparisons for dry edible beans are listed below.

The full report is available here.

More Dry Bean Acres Estimated in 2020

Area planted for dry beans in 2020 is estimated at 1.59 million acres, up 23 percent from last year. Area harvested is forecast to total 1.53 million acres, up 30 percent from last year. Eight out of nine estimating States show an increase in total dry bean planted acres compared to last year. Planted area in North Dakota is expected to be a record high.

View the full June Acreage Report from USDA here.

Crop Progress Report – June 29

North Dakota – Dry edible bean condition rated 2% very poor, 6% poor, 25% fair, 59% good, and 8% excellent. Dry edible beans emerged was 95%, near 96% last year. Blooming was 3%, near 1% last year.
 
Minnesota – Dry edible bean condition rated 0% very poor, 1% poor, 15% fair, 75% good, and 9% excellent. Blooming was 3%, 5 days ahead of last year and 1 day ahead of average.
 
Wyoming – Dry edible bean condition rated 9% fair, 87% good, and 4% excellent. Emerged was 97%, ahead of 69% last year and 82% average.
 
Colorado – Dry edible bean condition rated 9% very poor, 14% poor, 32% fair, 37% good, and 8% excellent. Emerged was 75%, ahead of 44% last year and 68% average.
 
Idaho – Dry edible bean condition rated 2% poor, 16% fair, 80% good, and 2% excellent.
 
Oregon – Dry edible bean condition rated 2% very poor, 2% poor, 13% fair, 62% good, and 2% excellent.
 
Washington – Dry edible bean condition rated 4% poor, 10% fair, 78% good, and 8% excellent.
 
Nebraska – Dry edible bean condition rated 26% fair, 67% good, and 10% excellent. Emerged was 95%, well ahead of 69% last year. Blooming was 3%.
 
Michigan – Planting is at 74%, ahead of 55% last year but behind 82% average. Emerged was 60%, ahead of 20% last year and equal to the five-year average.
 
View the latest USDA Weekly Crop Progress Report here.

Dry Bean Scene

A majority of the dry edible bean crop has emerged in northeastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. So far, it is off to an adequate start. Hear more from Huso Crop Consulting owner Mark Huso in the Dry Bean Scene made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Dry Bean Production Updates from China and Argentina

China:
An initial survey of China’s prospective dry bean planting reveals that production in 2020 is estimated to be down by 9% with total volume of 174,500 MT. Planting area is estimated down 9% with total sowing area of 110,400 hectares. Growers have been active planting light speckled kidney beans (LSKB), red speckled kidney beans (RSKB) and purple speckled kidney beans (PSKB) due to increased market demand. However, farmers have much less interest in growing black beans and white beans this year which have been basically been planted for export markets. As a result, sowing area for black beans has declined this year but the sowing area for LSKB, RSKB and PSKB is roughly at the same level as last year.
 
Argentina:
A late May frost damaged about 5% of the bean crop in some of the Argentine planting areas. Weather is expected to be good for the remaining harvest through the end of June. To date, quality is good for kidney beans and alubias and we are estimating increased production. Black beans will be mixed, due to the wider production area and frost damage. For cranberries, this was not a good year, and most beans available are small size and regular quality. The 2020 crop is already being shipped, especially black and LRK. Exporters are still cautious when it comes to offering alubias and kidneys, because beans are just getting to the processing facilities but exports are following a healthy pace to date.

Dry Bean Crop Progress Report

North Dakota – Dry edible bean condition rated 2% very poor, 3% poor, 23% fair, 65% good, and 7% excellent. Emerged was 78%, behind 89% last year and 92% average.
 
Minnesota – Dry edible bean condition rated 2% very poor, 1% poor, 15% fair, 74% good, and 10% excellent. Emerged was 98%, ahead of 85% last year and 95% average.
 
Wyoming – Dry edible bean condition rated 96% good, and 4% excellent. Emerged was 84%, ahead of 56% last year and 62% average.
 
Colorado – Dry edible bean condition rated 1% very poor, 18% poor, 49% fair, 28% good, and 4% excellent. Emerged was 51%, ahead of 18% last year and behind 48% average.
 
Idaho – Dry edible bean condition rated 1% poor, 19% fair, 77% good, and 3% excellent.
 
Oregon – Dry edible bean condition rated 1% very poor, 4% poor, 12% fair, 60% good, and 23% excellent.
 
Washington – Dry edible bean condition rated 4% poor, 10% fair, 78% good, and 8% excellent.
 
Nebraska – Dry edible bean condition rated 0% very poor, 0% poor, 23% fair, 67% good, and 10% excellent. Emerged was 82%.
 
Michigan – Planting is at 62%, ahead of 27% last year but behind 57% average. Emerged was 35%.
 
View the latest USDA Weekly Crop Progress Report here.

Dry Bean Scene

Farmers in the state of Michigan had more timely planting window for this year’s dry edible bean crop. Michigan State University Extension dry bean systems specialist Scott Bales describes planting conditions as “nearly ideal”. These conditions are much different compared to the previous year. Hear more in the Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.

Dry Bean Crop Progress

The weekly Crop Progress Report from USDA puts dry bean planting in Minnesota is at 98 percent complete. Emergence is at 93 percent, ahead of 81 percent average and 67 percent last year. The crop is rated 86 percent good to excellent.
 
Dry bean planting in North Dakota is 88 percent complete, behind 95 percent average and compared to 72 percent last week. Emergence is at 57 percent, behind 68 percent last year and well behind 77 percent average.
 
The Montana dry bean crop (including chickpeas) is 97 percent planted and 69 percent has emerged. Dry bean planting is mostly wrapped up in the Pacific Northwest. Crop emergence is at 86 percent in Idaho and 95 percent in Oregon.
 
Dry bean planting is well underway in other states at 90 percent in Wyoming, 75 percent complete in Colorado, 93 percent in Nebraska and 38 percent in Michigan. View the latest Crop Progress Report here.

Dry Bean Scene

According to the latest USDA Crop Progress Report, over half of the dry edible bean crop is emerging in Minnesota. Professional Agronomy Services agronomist Brad Guck says emergence is ahead of schedule in the Perham area thanks to a timely planting window. Hear more in this week’s Dry Bean Scene on the Red River Farm Network made possible, in part, by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.